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Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP)

The UROP scholarship is a great opportunity to stimulate undergraduate students’ interest in research, and encourage senior students to do graduate studies.

Congratulations to the following four students and their supervisors who participated in the program this year, you should be proud of your work!

  • Magalie Bourdeau-Potvin : “Comment la pandémie affecte-t-elle l’utilisation des technologies de l’information (TI) dans le milieu de la restauration?“ Supervised by Muriel Mignerat
  • Lina El Azrak : “Le rôle de la confiance dans l’intention d’achat d’aliments biologiques”  Supervised by Leila Hamzaoui-Essoussi
  • Aisha Gheriani : “Employees’ Perceptions of Fairness Toward their Co-workers Mental Health Accommodations” supervised by Jane O’Reilly.
  • Juliette Treble : “Bridging the Gap: Equating Three Keystone Health Gap Measures and Beyond” supervised by Kevin Brand.

Click here to learn more!

 

Did you know that you can earn 3 credits of ADM electives in your program by helping a professor with their current research project?

ADM 3998 Applied Research in Management allows you to work with a professor for 36 hours per term, helping you gain meaningful academic research experience, while participating in an exciting venture that will help us make a greener, healthier, happier and wealthier Canada.

Here is a list of research projects that might interest you:

Prof. Sara Hajmohammad’s “Climate Change and Supply Chain Resilience”: 
  • Climate change is causing a surge in the occurrence of extreme weather events (EWEs), such as the 2019 North American blizzard. Among other impacts, EWEs disrupt business supply chains, which hinders a firms’ ability to provide society with basic products and services, such as food, in the aftermath of the event. The pandemic has recently showcased the dismissive mentality, ill-preparedness, and experimental responses of firms and their supply chains to such uncertain disruptive events. Hence, it is crucial for firms to re-evaluate their vulnerabilities and build resilience into their supply chains; that is, to enhance their capabilities to be ready for, respond to, recover from, and transform and grow after learning from disruptions. To tackle this problem, the main question we address in this research project is “How can supply chain resilience be enhanced in response to EWEs?”. 
  • In Summer 2022, we plan to collect comprehensive secondary data about the past cases of supply chain disruptions in Canada due to EWEs from public records, newspaper coverage, social media data, government studies, professional associations’ reports, etc. 
Prof. Kouamé’s “Multidisciplinary review of emerging topics in business practices–Phase 2”:
  • The goal of this project is to go beyond the focus of a specific discipline on these emerging topics in order to achieve a multidisciplinary and integrated view.
  • The role of the students will consist of reviewing publications on the topics from the most impactful journals in the chosen disciplines. Given the multidisciplinary nature of the review, students from all management disciplines are welcome.
  • This project provides opportunities for students to familiarize themselves with the context of management research, to develop their skills in reviewing literature, and also to learn about emerging topics that can help them later in their professional practices.
Prof. David Large’s “Examining the Utility of the Theory of Cascading Commitment in the Context of Consumer Marketing Management - a Literature Review” 
  • The Theory of Cascading Commitment (TCC) was developed and proposed in the mid-nineties, and its applicability and utility empirically validated in the context of technology transfer from the public to the private sector. However, its applicability and utility are not confined to just tech transfer - it is applicable wherever an innovation champion needs to gain the commitment of a wide range of individuals and organizations in some kind of carefully-planned sequence, in order for the innovation to be successful.  
  • If the innovation champion is the Marketer in charge of an innovative consumer product, that Marketer needs to win the commitment of senior management, the R&D manager, the Marketing team itself, Beta users, the channel partners, the influencers, and ultimately of course the target consumers themselves. One false step could mean failure.  
  • The purpose of this research project is to carefully examine the Marketing, Consumer Marketing and New Product literature to find conceptual and empirical support for the 7 fundamental tenets of the TCC, thus establishing TCC's applicability and utility in the context of consumer marketing management.  
  • The end goal of the project is to produce a working paper worthy of submission to a recognized consumer marketing journal."   
Prof. David Large’s “Examining the Utility of the Theory of Cascading Commitment in the Context of Non-Coercive Organizational Change Management - a Literature Review” 
  • The Theory of Cascading Commitment (TCC) was developed and proposed in the mid-nineties, and and its applicability and utility empirically validated in the context of technology transfer from the public to the private sector. However, its applicability and utility are not confined to just tech transfer - it is applicable wherever an innovation champion needs to gain the commitment of a wide range of individuals and organizations in some kind of carefully-planned sequence, in order for the innovation to be successful.  
  • If the innovation champion is the Change Manager in charge of a non-coercive organizational change, that Change Manager needs to win the commitment of senior management, the involved departmental manager(s), the Communications team, the IT department, and ultimately of course the affected employees themselves. One false step could mean failure.  
  • The purpose of this research project is to carefully examine the Organizational Change literature to find conceptual and empirical support for the 7 fundamental tenets of the TCC, thus establishing TCC's applicability and utility in the context of organizational change management.  
  • The end goal of the project is to produce a working paper worthy of submission to a recognized organizational change journal." 
Prof. David Large’s “Examining the Utility of the Theory of Cascading Commitment in the Context of Start-Up Management - a Literature Review” 
  • The Theory of Cascading Commitment (TCC) was developed and proposed in the mid-nineties, and its applicability and utility empirically validated in the context of technology transfer from the public to the private sector. However, its applicability and utility are not confined to just tech transfer - it is applicable wherever an innovation champion needs to gain the commitment of a wide range of individuals and organizations in some kind of carefully planned sequence, in order for the innovation to be successful.  
  • If the innovation champion is the Entrepreneur or Start-Up Manager in charge of the start-up's success, then that Start-Up Manager needs to win the commitment of funders, partners, advisors, board members, employees, suppliers, channels, influencers, and most of all, paying customers! One false step could mean failure.  
  • The purpose of this research project is to carefully examine the Start-up Management and Entrepreneurship literature to find conceptual and empirical support for the 7 fundamental tenets of the TCC, thus establishing TCC's applicability and utility in the context of Start-up Management.  
  • The end goal of the project is to produce a working paper worthy of submission to a recognized entrepreneurial journal." 
Prof. Cheryl Qi’s “FINTRAC-uOttawa Telfer School of Management Collaboration Pilot”:
  • How do cryptocurrencies fit into Canada’s Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime and what are the vulnerabilities and money laundering/terrorist activity financing challenges of the most commonly used cryptocurrencies based on Canada’s regulatory framework?
  • What are some of the emerging technologies in FINTECH and how are illicit actors reportedly leveraging them to conduct their activities?
  • How has cryptocurrency been used in terrorist activity financing, what vulnerabilities and challenges are there under the regime established by the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act and its regulations?
Prof. Umar Ruhi’s “Comprehensive Evaluation of Online Disinformation-Countering Tools”:
  • While misinformation (unintentionally inaccurate information) and disinformation (intentionally deceptive information) have posed significant problems in civil democratic discourse for many centuries, these challenges have been greatly amplified in the digital age. The digital information ecosystem is polluted with different types of “fakes” including falsified news stories, satire, hoaxes, propaganda, rumours, and clickbait. Various combinations of these are being used as weapons by scammers, hackers, fearmongers, conspiracy theorists and election-meddlers to intentionally undermine citizen trust or cause public harm. To identify and counter these types of disinformation, various online tools have been developed in recent years by private sector companies, non-profit organizations, and civil society organizations. These tools range from websites powered by human fact-checkers to verify the accuracy of information, to bot and spam detection tools that can identify automated bot activity on social media, to automated artificial intelligence applications that can generate credibility ratings for online content.
  • In this research project, we aim to perform a comprehensive interdisciplinary study of various types of disinformation that is prevalent online today, and through a functional and user-experience evaluation of disinformation-countering tools that aim to help counter such disinformation.
Prof. Ramzi Fathallah’s “Resourcefulness and well-being of entrepreneurs in a conflict zone”: 
  • Current research on entrepreneurship in adverse environments emphasizes the resilience of entrepreneurs as they experience an adverse event. Resilience has overshadowed a true understanding of how entrepreneurs overcome challenges and perceive their well-being in contexts of continued hardship and recurrent adversity.  
  • Hence, we try to explore in this project: How do entrepreneurs in a recurrently disrupted and depleted community overcome their resource constraints? And how do they perceive their well-being in this context?  We examine the context of micro-entrepreneurs in Iraq as they adapt to multiple adversities in their home country. 
Prof. Ramzi Fathallah’s “Conducting management research in the Middle East ”: 
  • We make the case that capitalizing on local contexts in the Middle East could generate high quality research that advances our understanding of multiple management phenomena 
  • We offer a selective summary of recent research conducted in the Middle East that made important contributions to micro and macro management domains and theories. We also describe opportunities for future research in these domains. Finally, we offer practical and actionable advice on how to address typical challenges encountered when conducting management research in this region. 
Prof. Madeline Toubiana’s “(Peri)menopause and women’s careers”: 
  • According to the North American Menopause Society, over 1 billion women worldwide will have gone through perimenopause (and thus have become post-menopausal) by the year 2025. Despite the universality and inevitability of this female midlife health issue, its historically taboo nature has resulted in very little being known about how perimenopause and menopause affect women's careers.  
  • Our proposed research project aims to shed greater light on this topic. More specifically, we plan to collect and analyze data from interviews with approximately 60 career-women in their late 40s/early 50s to investigate not only how (peri)menopause influences women's workplace experiences, but also how women cope with such experiences. 
Prof. Madeline Toubiana’s “Shamework – transforming shame”: 
  • Shame is one of the most powerful moral emotions, “the master emotion of everyday life” (Scheff, 2003: 239). Shame is as an emotional response to a negative evaluation of our self as wrong or bad, due to a violation of social norms (Tangney et al., 2007; Turner & Stets, 2005), “the painful self-consciousness of, or anxiety about, negative judgment, unwanted exposure, inferiority, failure, and defeat” (Budden, 2009: 1033). People often feel shame when they violate institutional guidelines about who or how they should be or behave. Shame is thus an emotion that is based on a moral evaluation of right and wrong (Tangney, Stuewig and Mashek 2007), acting as a form of social control and self-discpline (Creed, Hudson, Okhuysen and Smith-Crowe 2014; Scheff, 2014).  
  • In this project we aim to build a more complex understanding of how people avoid, reject and transform shame, and do so by introducing the concept of shame work. Research assistance in this project will involve engaging with existing literature and helping construct a literature review. 
Prof. Yao Yao’s “Motivation and job attitudes of online gig workers”: 
  • The rise of digital platform-based work has been one of the most important workplace developments in the 2010s. Scholars across disciplines have examined online gig work from with diverse interests, but research on online gig workers’ attitudes, perceptions, and behaviours is still limited.  
  • To develop a good understanding of the existing, although limited, organizational behaviour literature on this topic, the project will first conduct a literature review of existing research. With the foundational knowledge from this literature review, we will further develop a theoretical model that captures workers’ attitudinal dynamics as they grapple with online work and offline work. Empirical data will be collected to test the model.    
  • As a research student to support the project, some tasks you may undertake include: assisting with the literature review, searching and summarizing relevant scales, and cleaning and organizing collected data.  
Prof. Yao Yao’s “A blessing or a curse? Exploring impacts of digital technologies on the legitimacy of the HRM profession”: 
  • The field of human resource management (HRM) has been characterized by ongoing struggles to establish power and status in organizations. Meanwhile, the day-to-day work of HRM, as in many other occupations, are being reshaped by the emergence and advance of new technologies. In the past decade, new applications such as people analytics, algorithmic management, and AI-powered interview tools, have been augmenting and automating the work of the HRM function.  
  • Do these technological advances render the expertise of HR profession obsolete and exacerbates its low power and status, or do they create new opportunities to demonstrate the value of HRM and help the profession to establish its legitimacy?  
  • This research aims to evaluate the impacts of new technologies on the HRM profession and its standing in organizations.  
  • In this project, the student will primarily assist in a literature review of the contemporary technologies used in HRM and the legitimacy struggle of the HR profession. The student also has the opportunity to participate in the collection, cleaning, and analysis of research data.   

If you’re interested in ADM 3998, please reach out to the This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

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