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Soumya Ananth
Soumya Ananth
2nd Year Student in Accounting

In today’s rapidly changing job market, having a good degree coupled with tangible and transferable skills has become a necessity. But the question to be asked is, which is more important: skills or a degree?

A degree is extremely important and something most of us spend 4-5 years to complete. It acts as a lifelong certification of your professional knowledge and shows employers that you are competent in your field of study. But in today’s world, where technologies such as artificial intelligence and big data analytics are rapidly evolving, the material you learn in university will almost become irrelevant and inapplicable in 5 to 10 years. Companies are starting to realize that a college/university degree does not necessarily prepare students for the reality of a future fueled by technology. Employees need to learn to adapt their skills and knowledge to the changing markets. That’s why acquiring relevant skills is actually more important than a degree. Whether they are hard or soft skills, they are transferable and applicable to any industry, any job, and any situation. Skills such as communication, critical thinking, and problem solving never go out of date and people who have these skills are always sought after. Gaining hands-on and tangible experiences in your field of study will better prepare you for what you will likely see when you enter the workforce.

That being said, university is a great place to acquire these skills! Through getting involved in clubs and organizations within your school, it helps you apply what you learn in the classroom to a more realistic and practical situation. It also helps you meet new people and work in teams, helping you develop your communication, teamwork and leadership skills. All in all, the skills you obtain through university, both inside and outside the classroom, are transferable and can help you excel in your future endeavours.


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